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Flash Fiction Tuesdays - Extract by Maria Goodin

Every week, we bring you a fresh, original 200-word story from one of of Legend's stable of exceptionally talented authors. This week we present an extract from a work by Maria Goodin, author of Nutmeg. Follow us on twitter with #LegendFlashFic to share and comment.

Each of us scrambled back behind the shed, grabbing at each other’s arms, pulling at each other’s t-shirts with no aim in mind. We were like a flock of panic-stricken sheep, fussing frantically but going nowhere. It seemed like Michael made a move to try to get away, flee in the direction we had just come from, but the rest of us were driven by the instinct to stay as still and as quiet as possible and we grabbed at him, pulling him into a huddle. If we’d have let him go, if we’d have run then, would that have made all the difference?

We froze, none of us daring to move a muscle, clutching at each other, our faces close.

My heart was pounding, and my legs felt weak. I had never seen anything like that in my life – not that wasn’t on TV. The thud of the boot on the man’s side, his cry of pain. Maybe we should have run but it seemed too late now. Now we just had to stay quiet and hope they hadn’t seen us. I tried to tune into the distant thump of the music, searching for any indication that civilization was still nearby, a tiny bit of comfort. But all I could hear was our breathing.

………………………………………….

“Do you want to kiss me?”

I squinted up at Amie. She took her lollypop out of her mouth an examined its decreasing size, a string of long brown hair falling down over her face.

“What for?” I asked.

She tucked the lollypop back into the side of her cheek and shrugged. “I dunno. To see what it’s like.”

I pulled up another piece of grass.

“Mmm…I dunno. I don’t mind. If you want to I guess.”

“Okay.”

I twiddled the blade of grass between my fingers.

“Well sit up then,” Amie ordered.

I lifted myself slowly to sitting. My arms seemed to have gone to sleep from so long lying in the grass.

“You have to close your eyes,” she said, tucking her hair behind her ear.

“Why?”

“’’Cause that’s how you do it,” she stated.

I closed my eyes, the warm sunshine filtering through my eyelids. I waited, feeling a bit nervous.

“Where are you going to kiss me?” I asked, suddenly opening my eyes. Amie, crawling towards me on her hands and knees, stopped and looked at me like I was stupid.

“On your lips of course.”

“Oh,” I said, very unsure what I thought of all this. “Okay then.”

I closed my eyes again and waited.

 

 

Maria Goodin's novel Nutmeg is available in bookshops and online